Book Review: Michael Peppiatt’s Francis Bacon in Your Blood is a fascinating exploration of the artist, the author, and a decades long friendship

As a young student in Swingin’ Sixties London, Michael Peppiatt met the star of British contemporary art, Francis Bacon. Initially just hoping to secure an interview for a university magazine, what followed was thirty years of friendship, late nights, copious amounts of champagne, and an interview that never really ended.

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Book Review: Brodie Lancaster’s No Way! Okay, Fine is a crash course in the power of thinking like Kanye

Shortlisted for the 2015 Richell Prize for Emerging Writers, No Way! Okay, Fine is the first book from writer, editor and occasional DJ Brodie Lancaster. A series of personal essays, Lancaster tackles just about everything, from growing up in a small town and a year spent in New York City, to early brushes with feminism and far too much time spent trying to be the “right kind” of fat, all presented with a hearty dose of related pop culture, movies, and music.

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Book Review: Shaun Greenhalgh’s A Forger’s Tale is an art memoir with a difference

An art memoir with a difference, A Forger’s Tale doesn’t trace the life and work of a celebrated artist, but that of Shaun Greenhalgh, one of Britain’s most infamous art forgers.

A working class kid from England’s North West, whose backyard workshop was jokingly referred by police as “the northern annex of the British Museum,” Greenhalgh seemed an unlikely candidate for swindling the distinctly upper class art establishment. But a genuine love of art, a dogged determination to achieve an authentic look, and contact with the right (well, technically the wrong) sort of people, saw him create pieces that astounded experts and had them parting with their pounds – albeit for sums far less than what they themselves expected to get once the humble Northerner had left their shop.

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